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COMMON AND OPPORTUNISTIC INTESTINAL PARASITIC INFECTIONS IN HIV INDIVIDUALS 

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Resource details

Resource ID

239

Access

Open

Contributed by

Rajan Karmacharya

Author/Contributor

Saroj Bhattarai

Publisher/Credit

St. Xavier's College

Date

16 November 16

Document type

Thesis or project

Department

Microbiology

Level

Master

Keywords

Intestinal parasites, HIV, CD4 count, Opportunistic parasites, Nepal.

Abstract

The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites in HIVseropositive
and HIV-seronegative individuals in Nepal. Stool specimens from 162 HIVseropositive
and 258 from HIV seronegative individuals were examined for the detection
of protozoal trophozoites, Oocyst, and cyst and helminthic eggs and larva. Microscopic
examination was done by normal saline wetmount, iodine preparation and kinoyun
modified ziehl neelsen staining method. Also, the stool specimens were concentrated by
formal ether sedimentation and sheathers sucrose flotation techniques. An overall
prevalence of intestinal parasites was found 32.1% (38.8% in HIV-seropositive subjects
and 27.9% in HIV-seronegative subjects). Entamoeba histolytica was the most common
parasites in HIV-seropositive subjects (30.9%), whereas Giardia lamblia was the most
common parasites among HIV-seronegative groups (40.0%). HIV infection remains an
important risk factor for acquiring intestinal parasitic infections. Male gender, CD4 count
<200 cells/μl and diarrhea were significantly associated with an increased prevalence of
intestinal parasitic infections among HIV-positive patients. The level of education,
occupation and source of water among HIV-patients affected the prevalence of intestinal
parasitic infections though the result was not significant. Multiparasitic infections were
prominent among HIV-negative subjects (11.11%) than HIV-positive subjects (7.9%)
though the result was not significant. Similarly the helminthic infections were found
prominent in HIV-negative subjects (16.3%) than HIV positive subjects (11.7%).
Opportunistic parasites Cryptosporidium parvum, Cyclospora cyataenensis, Isospora
belli were most commonly prevalent among HIV-positives (33.8%) than HIV-ve
individuals (12.5%). Present study focuses the importance of routine screening of
intestinal parasites in HIV-positive individuals.

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